Saturday, July 29, 2017

Eisen-Martin, Scott, Wayne 9/15 7 pm @ Ford Food and Drink


Switch No. 41 presents Tongo Eisen-Martin from the Bay, Jordan Scott from Vancouver, B.C., and Portland's own Phoebe Wayne

Where: Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave, PDX

When: Friday, September 15, 7 p.m. sharp


Tongo Eisen-Martin is the author of Heaven Is All Goodbyes, number 61 in the City Lights Pocket Poets Series. His previous poetry collection is the critically acclaimed someone's dead already, and his work has been featured in Harper's Magazine. He is also a movement worker and educator whose work in Rikers Island was featured in the New York Times. He has been a faculty member at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, and his curriculum on extrajudicial killing of Black people, "We Charge Genocide Again!" has been used as an educational and organizing tool throughout the country.


Jordan Scott is the author of Silt (2005), and from Coach House Books: blert (2008), Decomp (2013, a collaboration with Stephen Collis and the ecosphere of British Columbia) and Night & Ox (2016). Scott’s chapbooks include Clearance Process (SMALL CAPS 2016), and Lanterns at Guantánamo (Simon Fraser University). Both chapbooks treat his experience after being allowed access to Guantanamo Bay in April 2015. Scott was the 2015/16 Writer-in-Residence at Simon Fraser University and works with Broc Rossell at The Elephants (www.theelephants.net).





Phoebe Wayne is a public librarian and the author of the chapbooks The Sleep Volumes (dancing girl press) and Lovejoy (c_L press). She is also the author of an art/poetry collaboration titled Aa, and poems published or forthcoming in journals such as Yew, Horse Less Review, and Trickhouse. She lives in Portland, Oregon with her family.


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

6/9 Knittle, Quinn, Yeary 7 pm @ Ford Food and Drink

Switch No. 40 presents Davy Knittle from Philadelphia, and Portland's own Hajara Quinn and James Yeary

Where: Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave, PDX

When: Friday, June 9, 7 p.m. sharp


Davy Knittle is the author of the chapbooks empathy for cars / force of july (horse less press 2016) and cyclorama (the operating system 2015). His poems and reviews have appeared recently in Jacket2, Fence, Denver Quarterly and The Brooklyn Rail. He lives in Philadelphia where he curates the City Planning Poetics series at the Kelly Writers House.











Hajara Quinn lives in Portland OR. She is an assistant editor for Octopus Books, Program Director at the IPRC, and the author of the chapbook Unnaysayer (Flying Object 2013). Her poems have appeared in Gulf Coast, The Volta and Sixth Finch, and she is the recipient of a 2015 Oregon Literary Fellowship. Her first book, Coolth is forthcoming from Big Lucks Books in 2017.






James Yeary is, with Nate Orton, co-author of My Night at Chopsticks III (Abandoned Bike, 2017), a political and phenomenological survey of a Portland karaoke venue (and pop-up book). My Night at Chopsticks III is the 41st installment of the my day series. He has his fingers in a handful of micropresses, and writes for the Northwest Review of Books.


Wednesday, April 26, 2017

5/13 Hasegawa, Levin, Putnam and Sneathen 7 pm @ IPRC

Switch No. 39 presents Kreg Hasegawa from Seattle, Lauren Levin and Eric Sneathen from Oakland, and Portland's own C.E. Putnam

Where: IPRC, 1001 SE Division, PDX

When: Saturday, May 13, 7 p.m. sharp


Kreg Hasegawa is the author of the chapbook The New Crustacean (2007). His short stories have been published in Sal Mimeo and The Sienese Shredder (edited by Trevor Winkfield), among other very small magazines. He is currently a member of Interrupture, a group of poets who create and perform poetry games, and Margin Shift, a poetry collective in Seattle. A new chapbook is forthcoming in the fall. He works as a librarian.



Lauren Levin is the author of THE BRAID (Krupskaya, 2016) and the forthcoming TWO ESSAYS (Timeless, Infinite Light, 2018) as well as several chapbooks. From 2011-2014, she co–edited the Poetic Labor Project. She grew up in New Orleans and lives in Richmond, CA with her family.





Eric Sneathen splits his time between Oakland and UC Santa Cruz, where he is a PhD student in Literature. His poetry has been published by Mondo Bummer, littletell, Faggot Journal, P-Queue and The Equalizer, and his first collection, Snail Poems, is out now from Krupskaya.









C.E. Putnam maintains the Putnam Institute for Space Opera Research in Portland, OR. His six book back catalog was published on the Autumnal Equinox in 2012. The chapbook "The Bunny Manuscript: Episode 3" is from the Little Red Leaves Textile series. His Halloween themed psych-mixes can be listened to here: https://m.mixcloud.com/PISOR/

Sunday, March 12, 2017

3/25 Scappettone, Herrera, & DinéYazhi´ 7 p.m. @ IPRC

Switch No. 38 presents Jennifer Scappettone from Chicago and Portland's own Brandi Katherine Herrera & Demian DinéYazhi´


Where: IPRC, 1001 SE Division, PDX

When: Saturday, March 25, 7 p.m. sharp

Brandi Katherine Herrera is a Portland, Ore. based multidisciplinary artist, poet, and translator, whose work in text, film, and sound explores the poetics of space. She is the author of Mutterfarbe, a limited edition artist book of color theory, experimental translation, photography, and poems, and Natürlicher, a chapbook of color swatch poems (Broken Cloud Press, 2016). Her work is held in various private and public collections, including the Seattle Art Museum, and Yale University's Faber Birren Collection of Books on Color, and has been featured in a number of solo and group exhibitions, performance series, and publications, including 23 Sandy Gallery, Cube Gallery, Poetry Press Week, Pure Surface, The Volta, Octopus Magazine, The Common, and Poor Claudia, among others.



photo by Dino Ignani
Jennifer Scappettone works at the crossroads of writing, translation, and scholarly research, on the page and off. She is the author of the hybrid-genre verse books From Dame Quickly (Litmus, 2009) and The Republic of Exit 43: Outtakes & Scores from an Archaeology and Pop-Up Opera of the Corporate Dump (just out from Atelos Press), and of the scholarly monograph Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice (Columbia University Press, 2014). Her translations from the Italian of the polyglot poet and musicologist Amelia Rosselli were collected in Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli. She founded, and curates, PennSound Italiana, a new sector of the audiovisual archive based at the University of Pennsylvania devoted to experimental Italian poetry. Her installation pieces were exhibited most recently at Una Vetrina Gallery in Rome and WUHO Gallery in Los Angeles, and she has collaborated on site-specific performance works with a wide spectrum of musicians, architects, code artists, and dancers, at locations ranging from the tract of Trajan’s aqueduct beneath the American Academy in Rome to Fresh Kills Landfill. Scappettone is an associate professor of various subjects at the University of Chicago.

Demian DinéYazhi´ (born 1983) is an Indigenous Diné transdisciplinary artist born to the clans Naasht'ézhí Tábąąhá (Zuni Clan Water's Edge) & Tódích'íí'nii (Bitter Water). Through research, mining community archives, and social collaboration and activism, DinéYazhi´ highlights the intersections of Radical Indigenous Queer Feminist identity and political ideology while challenging the white noise of the contemporary art movement. DinéYazhi´ is the founder of the artist/activist initiative, R.I.S.E.: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment, which is dedicated to the education, perseverance, & evolution of Indigenous art & culture. DinéYazhi´ also serves as co-director for the zine, Locusts: A Post-Queer Nation Zine. DinéYazhi´ is currently a 2017 resident for Portland Institute of Contemporary Art’s Creative Exchange Lab Residency Program, as well as an awarded recipient of Crow’s Shadow 2017 Golden Spot Residency. You can follow him on Instagram @heterogeneoushomosexual.

Friday, February 17, 2017

3/14: Abreu, Goldberg, Harris @ IPRC 7 p.m.

Switch No. 37 presents three innovative poets, thinkers and artists from NYC and Portland.

Who: manuel arturo abreu, Ariel Goldberg and Jamondria Harris

Where: IPRC, 1001 SE Division, PDX

When: Tuesday, March 14, 7 p.m. sharp

manuel arturo abreu (b. 1991, Santo Domingo) is a poet and artist from the Bronx. Currently living and working in a garage in southeast Portland, they received their BA in Linguistics from Reed College in 2014. Recent work in AA|LA, As It Stands (LA), INCA (Seattle), Rhizome, Open Space, NewHive, et al. They wrote List of Consonants (Bottlecap Press, 2015) and transtrender (Quimérica Books). They co-facilitate home school, a free pop-up art school in Portland. Find manuel at www.manuelarturoabr.eu.



ARIEL GOLDBERG is a writer, artist and curator. Their publications include The Estrangement Principle (Nightboat Books) and The Photographer (Roof Books). Goldberg is the Friday Night Coordinator at The Poetry Project. Their research and performance based work has been supported by the New York Public Library, Franklin Furnace Fund, Headlands Center for the Arts, The Invisible Dog, Residencias Artísticas Intercambios and SOMA in Mexico City. They teach at Parsons, The New School, Pratt Institute, and New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, Department of Photography & Imaging.


Jamondria Marnice Harris is a poet & artist living in Portland. They use words, sounds, wires, instruments, textiles & what falls into their hands to engage with blackness, desire, decolonization, fairy tales, femme supremacy, & body horror. They are a VONA Workshop Fellow, among other things. Their music can be found at soundcloud.com/meroitic.

Thursday, August 18, 2016

9/17: Coleman, Collis, Rhodes & Sand @ Roll Up

The Switch is super happy to host this special event!

Switch No. 36: Jen Coleman, Stephen Collis and Kaia Sand-- with a special pop up show of paintings by Jeremy Okai Davis!

When: Saturday, September 17, 7 p.m. 

Where: Roll Up Photo Studio and Gallery, 1715 SE Spokane St. Portland


After reading her newly released book We Denizens (Furniture Press, July 2016) Poet Graham Foust dubbed Jen Coleman the "bittersweet cartoonist" of the heart. Her first book, Psalms for Dogs and Sorcerers, was selected by Dara Weir for the Bob Kaufman book award from Trembling Pillow Press in 2013. Jen is part of the Spare Room reading collective and works for Oregon Environmental Council. 








Stephen Collis’s many books of poetry include The Commons (Talon Books 2008; 2014), On the Material (Talon Books 2010—awarded the BC Book Prize for Poetry), DECOMP (with Jordan Scott—Coach House 2013), and Once in Blockadia (Talon Books 2016). He has also written two books of literary criticism, a book of essays on the Occupy Movement, and a novel. In 2014 he was sued for $5.6 million by U.S. energy giant Kinder Morgan, whose lawyers read his writing in court as “evidence.” He lives near Vancouver, on unceded Coast Salish Territory, and teaches poetry and poetics at Simon Fraser University.

In the work of Jeremy Okai Davis, color use and fidelity to his subjects make them feel alive, but without being too literal. The work feels really light at first glance, but on closer examination of text and posture, the work is full of conflict, an exploration of the contrast between the shiny, smiling exterior that is frequently presented on the surface and the inner, self-conscious, status obsessed mind state that so many of us endure beneath it all.


Leo Rhodes is a Street Roots vendor and board member, and a community organizer with experience organizing self-managed tent cities and indoor and outdoor shelters in both Seattle and Portland. He is a military veteran and brings the experience of homelessness and the Native American perspective as a member of the Pima tribe. Leo is currently completing a memoir told through poetry and prose, as well as a play based on the founding of Right2DreamToo.


Kaia Sand is the author of the newly released A Tale of Magicians Who Puffed Up Money that Lost its Puff (Tinfish Press 2016) as well as Remember to Wave (Tinfish Press 2010), and interval (Edge Books), a Small Press Traffic book of the year in 2004; and co-author with Jules Boykoff of Landscapes of Dissent: Guerrilla Poetry and Public Space (Palm Press, 2008). With Garrick Imatani, she was an artist-in-residence from 2013-2015 at the City of Portland Archives and Records Center, responding to historical surveillance files on local political activists. This past spring she exhibited Moth, Flame, Desire, at the Portland Community College Cascade Gallery, after serving in the Despina Artist Residency at Largo das Artes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She works across genres and media, dislodging poetry from the book into more unconventional contexts; she documents work at kaiasand.net.



Wednesday, August 17, 2016

9/9: Carrie Hunter @ Littman Gallery with Ben Glas

We are very excited to co-host a reading with the Littman Gallery by Bay Area poet Carrie Hunter, as a part of an exhibition of a sound work by artist Ben Glas. Please join us for Switch no. 37!
Reading by Carrie Hunter
When:
Friday, September 9, 7:00 p.m.
Where:
Littman Gallery at Portland State University, 1825 SW Broadway, Smith Memorial Student Union (SMSU), Portland.
Ben Glas Ing Ing (Variation 3) 
On view
September 9, 12 – 4 p.m.
Carrie Hunter received her MFA/MA in the Poetics program at New College of California, edits the chapbook press, ypolita press, and is on the editorial board of Black Radish Books. Her latest chapbook Vice/Versa recently came out with Dancing Girl Press. Her full-length collection, The Incompossible, was published in 2011 by Black Radish Books, and another, Orphan Machines, came out in 2015. She lives in San Francisco and teaches ESL. 

Ben Glas is an interdisciplinary artist and composer based in Portland, Oregon. Glas' work focuses intently on egalitarian proprioception, stasis/rush within digital systems, and notions of spacetime. Working extensively with sine-waves and unconventional softwares, Glas engages physical spaces and their ephemeral inhabitants to remind participants of a momentary sonic awareness within space and time.  

Ing Ing (Variation 3) is an experiential tonal composition that merges time and space, proprioception and movement. Utilizing open-ended drones and acoustic beating, its installation space becomes an interactive 3D album; the choice of movement and composition are in the hands and minds of each individual listener, as they sculpt their own experience in space.