Friday, March 9, 2018

Arterian, Lee, Tran April 2 @ Ford Food and Drink

Switch No. 46: We're thrilled to host Diana Arterian, Janice Lee and Stacey Tran

Where: Ford Food and Drink
2505 SE 11th Ave, Portland 

When: Monday, April 2, 7 pm sharp


Diana Arterian is the author of Playing Monster :: Seiche (1913 Press, 2017), the chapbooks With Lightness & Darkness and Other Brief Pieces (Essay Press, 2017) and Death Centos (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2013), and coeditor of Among Margins: Critical & Lyrical Writing on Aesthetics (Ricochet, 2016). Her creative work has been recognized with fellowships from the Banff Centre, Caldera, Vermont Studio Center, and Yaddo; and her poetry, essays, and translations have appeared in Asymptote, BOMB, Black Warrior Review, Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, and Los Angeles Review of Books, among others. Born and raised in Arizona, Arterian currently resides in Los Angeles, where she serves as poetry editor at Noemi Press and is a PhD candidate in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California.


Janice Lee is the author of KEROTAKIS (Dog Horn Press, 2010), Daughter (Jaded Ibis, 2011), Damnation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013), Reconsolidation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2015), and The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016). She writes about the filmic long take, slowness, interspecies communication, the apocalypse, and asks the question, how do we hold space open while maintaining intimacy? She is Founder & Executive Editor of Entropy, Co-Publisher at Civil Coping Mechanisms, and Contributing Editor at Fanzine. After living for over 30 years in California, she recently moved from Los Angeles to Portland, Oregon where she is an Assistant Professor of Fiction at Portland State University.


Stacey Tran is a writer from Portland, OR. She is the creator of Tender Table, a storytelling series about food, family, identity. She is the author of Soap for the Dogs (Gramma, 2018).



Tuesday, February 13, 2018

dan raphael & Anastacia-Renee 3/16 7:30 p.m. @ Ford Food and Drink

Switch No. 45 brings together two incredible performers: Anastasia-Renee from Seattle and Portland's own dan raphael

Where: Ford Food and Drink
2505 SE 11th Ave, Portland 

When: Friday, March 16, 7:30 p.m. sharp


Anastacia-Renee is the current Civic Poet of Seattle, recipient of the 2017 Artist of the Year Award, and former 2015-2017 Poet-in-Residence at Hugo House. She is the author of five books: Forget It (Black Radish Books), (v.), (Gramma Press) 26, (Dancing Girl Press), Kiss Me Doll Face (Gramma Press) and Answer(Me) (Winged City Chapbooks, Argus Press) and has received writing fellowships from Cave Canem, Hedgebrook, VONA, Artist Trust and Jack Straw, as well as a writing residency from Ragdale. Her theatrical mixed-media project, 9 Ounces: A One Woman Show, is a multivalent play unapologetically downward dogging its way through class, race, culture, oppression, depression, survival and epiphany. Her cross-genre writing has appeared in the anthologies: Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism, Sinister Wisdom: Black Lesbians—We Are the Revolution, Revise the Psalm: Work Celebrating the Writing of Gwendolyn Brooks and literary magazines in and print and online: Split this Rock, Painted Bride Quarterly, Crab Creek Review, Seattle Review, Bone Bouquet, Duende, Synaethesia, Banqueted, Torch and many more. She teaches poetry and creative writing at Hugo House and Seattle University and lives as a superhero in Seattle with her wife and dog.



For over three decades, dan raphael’s been active in the Northwest as poet, performer, editor and reading host. The Closer You Get to Nowhere, his 20th book, will come out this fall from Last Word Press, which published Everyone in This Movie Gets Paid in June 2016. Current poems appear in Caliban, Otoliths, Courtship of Birds, Blackbox Manifold and In Between Hangovers. He is prose editor of Unlikely Stories, hosts the Fo Po Poetry series, and writes & records a news poem every Wednesday for the KBOO Evening News.



Thursday, December 28, 2017

Brolaski, Larsen, & Tillinghast 1/13 7 p.m. @ IPRC

Switch No. 44 pairs Julian Talamantez Brolaski from Santa Barbara, David Larsen from New York City, & Julia Clare Tillinghast from right here in Portland...

Where: IPRC, 318 SE Main St., Portland, OR

When: Saturday, January 13, 7 p.m. sharp
$5 donation at the door; no one turned away


Julian Talamantez Brolaski is poet and country singer, the author of Macho Chango (forthcoming Wave Books 2019), Of Mongrelitude (Wave Books 2017), Advice for Lovers (City Lights 2012), gowanus atropolis (Ugly Duckling Presse 2011), and co-editor of NO GENDER: Reflections on the Life & Work of kari edwards (Litmus Press / Belladonna Books 2009).  Julian is the lead singer and rhythm guitarist in the bands Juan & the Pines (NYC) and The Western Skyline (Oakland).  It currently lives in Santa Barbara, researching and editing a book on the Mescalero Apache initiation ceremony with its grandmother, Inés Talamantez.

David Larsen is a US poet and translator of pre-modern Arabic literature. His article on the prison poetry of ‘Alī ibn al-Jahm (d. 863 CE) appeared in a 2016 Festschrift for Everett Rowson, and in 2017 his translation of the Names of the Lion of Ibn Khālawayh (d. 980) was brought out in a new edition by Wave Books. His verse collection The Thorn came out in 2005 from Faux Press. At The Switch, he'll read cat poems dating to the 8th-11th centuries. David Larsen lives in New York City.




Julia Clare Tillinghast is from Michigan. She studied poetry at Sarah Lawrence College and Virginia Tech, where she received her MFA. She has spent a number of years, on and off, living in Istanbul, Turkey, and is Co-Translator, along with Richard Tillinghast, of Dirty August, a Selected Poems of the experimental 20th-century Turkish poet Edip Cansever. In addition to translations in Agni, Guernica, Arts & Letters, Poetry Daily, The Boston Review & others, she has had or has forthcoming original poems in 3:AM Magazine, The Bakery, Fence Magazine, H_NGM_N, Passages North, Pank, Pleiades, Rattle, Salt Hill, Sixth Finch, Sou'Wester, and Tin House. She lives in Portland with her partner, Matthew, and children, Owen & Hamza.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Cisper & Sigo 12/2 7 p.m. @ IPRC

Switch No. 43 presents Mary Cisper from New Mexico, Cedar Sigo from San Francisco and Portland's own Sara Sutter

Where: IPRC, 318 SE Main St., Portland, OR

When: Saturday, December 2, 7 p.m. sharp

$5 donation at the door; no one turned away



Cedar Sigo was raised on the Suquamish Reservation in the Pacific Northwest and studied at The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at the Naropa Institute. He is the editor of There You Are: Interviews, Journals, and Ephemera, on Joanne Kyger (forthcoming from Wave Books, 2017), and author of eight books and pamphlets of poetry, including Royals (Wave Books, 2017), Language Arts (Wave Books, 2014), Stranger in Town (City Lights, 2010), Expensive Magic (House Press, 2008), and two editions of Selected Writings (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2003 and 2005). 







Amid bindweed and migrating hummingbirds, Mary Cisper lives in northern New Mexico.  Her first poetry collection, Dark Tussock Moth, won the 2016 Trio House Award (Trio House Press, 2017).  Her poems and reviews have been published in various journals including Denver Quarterly, ZYZZYVA, Lana Turner, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Terrain, Water-Stone Review, Newfound, FIELD, and Omniverse.  A former chemist, she was once on intimate terms with ion trap mass spectrometers.  She recently completed her MFA in Poetry at Saint Mary’s College of California.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Carr, Olstein and Vermaas, October 7, 7 pm @ IPRC

Switch No. 42 presents Julie Carr from Boulder, Lisa Olstein from Austin, and Portland's own Jake Vermaas

Where: IPRC, 318 SE Main St., Portland, OR


When: Saturday, October 7, 7 p.m. sharp

$5 donation at the door; no one turned away

Julie Carr is the author of six books of poetry, including 100 Notes on Violence (Ahsahta, 2010), RAG (Omnidawn, 2014), and Think Tank (Solid Objects, 2015). She is also the author of two prose works: Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry (Dalkey Archive, 2013) and Objects from a Borrowed Confession (Ahsahta, 2017). With Jeffrey Robinson she is the co-editor of Active Romanticism (University of Alabama Press, 2015). A chapbook of prose, “The Silence that Fills the Future,” was released as a free pdf from Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-19/

Carr’s co-translation of Leslie Kaplan’s Excess-The Factory is due out from Commune Editions in 2018, as is a mixed-genre work, Reallife: An Installation (Omnidawn). Also to be published in 2018 is her book of critical essays, Someone Shot my Book (University of Michigan Press).

Carr was a 2011-12 NEA fellow and is an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado in Boulder in the English department and the Intermedia Arts Writing and Performance Ph.D. She regularly collaborates with dance artist K.J. Holmes and, with Tim Roberts, is the co-founder of Counterpath Press, Counterpath Gallery, and Counterpath Community Garden (www.counterpathpress.org) in Denver.

Lisa Olstein is the author of four poetry collections: Radio Crackling, Radio Gone (Copper Canyon Press 2006), winner of the Hayden Carruth Award; Lost Alphabet (Copper Canyon Press 2009), a Library Journal best book of the year; Little Stranger (Copper Canyon Press 2013), a Lannan Literary Selection; and Late Empire, forthcoming from Copper Canyon in fall 2017. Her chapbook, The Resemblance of the Enzymes of Grasses to Those of Whales Is a Family Resemblance, won an Essay Press prize and was released in 2016. Her work has appeared in many journals and anthologies, and her honors include a Pushcart Prize, a Lannan Writing Residency, and fellowships from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, Massachusetts Cultural Council, and Centrum.

A member of the poetry faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, Olstein  teaches in the New Writers Project and Michener Center for Writers MFA programs. She is also the lyricist for the rock band Cold Satellite, fronted by acclaimed songwriter Jeffrey Foucault. Previously, she co-founded and for ten years directed the Juniper Summer Writing Institute at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, where she also served as associate director of the MFA program. She serves as an associate editor for Tupelo Quarterly, a contributing editor for jubilat, and advisor for Bat City Review.

Olstein earned a BA from Barnard College and an MFA from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, undertaking additional studies at the Aegean Center for Fine Arts and Harvard Divinity School.

Jake Vermaas is the co-founder of the Whitenoise Project, a reading and discussion series aiming to center writers of color and underrepresented voices. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Gramma Poetry, Capitalism Nature Socialism, and TAYO. A poet and engineer in Portland, OR, he can science the shit out of things and actually be Asian, unlike Matt Damon.
 


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Eisen-Martin, Scott, Wayne 9/15 7 pm @ Ford Food and Drink


Switch No. 41 presents Tongo Eisen-Martin from the Bay, Jordan Scott from Vancouver, B.C., and Portland's own Jen Coleman

Where: Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave, PDX

When: Friday, September 15, 7 p.m. sharp


Tongo Eisen-Martin is the author of Heaven Is All Goodbyes, number 61 in the City Lights Pocket Poets Series. His previous poetry collection is the critically acclaimed someone's dead already, and his work has been featured in Harper's Magazine. He is also a movement worker and educator whose work in Rikers Island was featured in the New York Times. He has been a faculty member at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, and his curriculum on extrajudicial killing of Black people, "We Charge Genocide Again!" has been used as an educational and organizing tool throughout the country.


Jordan Scott is the author of Silt (2005), and from Coach House Books: blert (2008), Decomp (2013, a collaboration with Stephen Collis and the ecosphere of British Columbia) and Night & Ox (2016). Scott’s chapbooks include Clearance Process (SMALL CAPS 2016), and Lanterns at Guantánamo (Simon Fraser University). Both chapbooks treat his experience after being allowed access to Guantanamo Bay in April 2015. Scott was the 2015/16 Writer-in-Residence at Simon Fraser University and works with Broc Rossell at The Elephants (www.theelephants.net).






Jen Coleman lives in Portland and works at Oregon Environmental Council. She spent some time as part of the Spare Room reading collective and the 13 Hats collaborative arts project. Jen is author of We Denizens (Furniture Press, 2016) and Psalms for Dogs and Sorcerers (Trembling Pillow Press, 2013). You can see some of her work at http://acrossthemargin.com/jennifercoleman/

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

6/9 Knittle, Quinn, Yeary 7 pm @ Ford Food and Drink

Switch No. 40 presents Davy Knittle from Philadelphia, and Portland's own Hajara Quinn and James Yeary

Where: Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave, PDX

When: Friday, June 9, 7 p.m. sharp


Davy Knittle is the author of the chapbooks empathy for cars / force of july (horse less press 2016) and cyclorama (the operating system 2015). His poems and reviews have appeared recently in Jacket2, Fence, Denver Quarterly and The Brooklyn Rail. He lives in Philadelphia where he curates the City Planning Poetics series at the Kelly Writers House.











Hajara Quinn lives in Portland OR. She is an assistant editor for Octopus Books, Program Director at the IPRC, and the author of the chapbook Unnaysayer (Flying Object 2013). Her poems have appeared in Gulf Coast, The Volta and Sixth Finch, and she is the recipient of a 2015 Oregon Literary Fellowship. Her first book, Coolth is forthcoming from Big Lucks Books in 2017.






James Yeary is, with Nate Orton, co-author of My Night at Chopsticks III (Abandoned Bike, 2017), a political and phenomenological survey of a Portland karaoke venue (and pop-up book). My Night at Chopsticks III is the 41st installment of the my day series. He has his fingers in a handful of micropresses, and writes for the Northwest Review of Books.